Mercedes-Benz X-Class review

The Mercedes-Benz X-Class is the forthcoming pickup truck from Daimler, which will share the same chassis as the Nissan Navara and Renault Alaskan. The Mercedes-Benz X-Class will plug a huge gap in Daimler’s portfolio, which is the world’s largest commercial vehicle manufacturer, and will compete with the Volkswagen Amarok and Ford Ranger at the premium end of the sector.

The differences between the Mercedes-Benz X-Class and the Renault and Nissan models is a lot more than just a new front. Engineers at Daimler have spent the last couple of years widening the track and chassis of the X-Class, and there will be a more powerful 3.0-litre, six-cylinder turbo-diesel model.

Mercedes-Benz unveiled two concept models of the X-Class in Stockholm in October 2016 for the two different types of customers that it is targeting. The X-Class Powerful Adventurer was aimed at commercial 4×4 operators that spend a lot of their time on the outback, while the X-Class Stylish Explorer is pitched to business executives who need an attractive and comfortable vehicle that is able to go off-road occasionally.

Mercedes-Benz X-Class specification

Mercedes-Benz X-Class cab interior

Mercedes-Benz X-Class cab interior

The Mercedes-Benz X-Class will be a generously-specced vehicle unlike any other that we’ve seen before. Standard equipment is expected include a touchscreen-display, reversing sensors, steering-mounted controls and air-conditioning.

The X-Class will also set new standards in the segment with regard to telematics and connectivity. There is an on-board SIM card so it will be possible to use the extensive Mercedes me connect services. Drivers can connect with their pickup by smartphone, tablet or PC at any time and from anywhere.

Mercedes-Benz X-Class cab interior

Mercedes-Benz X-Class cab interior

Mercedes-Benz X-Class engine and driveline

Mercedes-Benz X-Class engine

Mercedes-Benz X-Class engine

Daimler has announced that the Mercedes-Benz X-Class will be offered with a range of four and six-cylinder engines, with the possibility of a petrol engine. The four-cylinder likely relates to the 2.3-litre Renault-Nissan engine, while the six-cylinder possibly hints at Merc’s own V6 diesel that powers the Mercedes-Benz G-Wagon, GLS and S-Class. The engines will be coupled to either a six-speed manual or seven-speed automatic transmission and fuel economy is expected to be as high as 44 to 45mpg.

Mercedes-Benz X-Class engine

Mercedes-Benz X-Class engine

Mercedes-Benz X-Class towing and load area

Mercedes-Benz X-Class

Mercedes-Benz X-Class

Despite having all the mod-cons and superior ride and handling, the Mercedes-Benz X-Class will be quite a productive workhorse, too. Double-cab models will feature a 3.5t towing capacity and the load bed boasts pretty impressive dimensions of 1,578mm long by 1,560mm wide. Payloads, however, are likely to fall well short of the sector average, with even the strongest models only managing around 1,050kg.

Mercedes-Benz X-Class Off-road

 Mercedes-Benz X-Class off-road

Mercedes-Benz X-Class off-road

The four-wheel drive system may be branded as 4Matic (like the rest of the Mercedes-Benz four-wheel drive range), but it is effectively Nissan’s fully-electric system which also featured in the X-Trail, Qashqai and Pathfinder. It has three settings; 2Hi, 4Hi and 4Lo, and there is a centre differential lock. It’s expected the X-Class will have the same approach and departure angles (31-degrees) and ground clearance (228mm) as the Nissan Navara.

Mercedes-Benz X-Class price and availability

Mercedes-Benz X-Class

Mercedes-Benz X-Class

Merc are only predicting modest sales for the first 12 months, as it is the first time it has entered this segment. The Mercedes-Benz X-Class will be available only through Merc’s dedicated commercial vehicle network, which number around 80 in the UK, and prices are expected to be on the more expensive side (starting at around £22,000 plus VAT).

Also read: New pickups coming soon.

Mercedes-Benz X-Class review

About The Author
- Liam Campbell is an award-winning journalist with a Masters degree in Automotive Journalism from Coventry University. Growing up on a farm and learning to drive in a Mark 1 Range Rover (his left thigh is still twice as big as his right), Liam likes to think he knows a thing or two about commercial 4x4s. Previously, he was the Van Editor at Parkers and resident pickup expert at Car Magazine, before taking up the post of Editor at Professional Pickup & 4x4. Follow him on Twitter https://twitter.com/maxximum_load

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